Knowledge of the Holy: part 8

The omniscience of God seems a given in light of all we’ve discussed so far. The Creator of all things, the Eternal, Self-sufficient, Infinite God could not be anything less than omniscient.
What Tozer seems to overlook is the apparent implications of omniscience on the Christian prayer life. Why would the omniscient God want us to pray to Him, if He already knows? I have no answer, really. However, I think Tozer implies the beginnings of an answer when he says, “He never wonders about anything nor (except when drawing men out for their own good) does He seek information or ask questions” (56).
When we think of drawing someone out, it is usually in the context of getting to know someone better, or to see their personality in its fullness. To a certain degree, though in a different way, I think that a similar exercise goes on when we pray. The difference is that God draws us out not for His benefit, but for ours. Prayer doesn’t change God, prayer changes me, to echo CS Lewis. We can learn a lot about our relationship with God and about ourselves through our prayers. Do we worship and adore Him, or do we ply Him with requests as though He were Santa Clause or a short-order cook? Do we listen, or do we spend all our time in a one-sided monologue?
Beyond introducing us to ourselves, however, I think prayer also serves to remind us to whom we pray. Think about God’s response to Job. Who is this who would stand before me and speak of that which he does not know? Answer me this…. Did God really need Job to answer. Of course not, nor did He, I think, expect an answer. God’s questions served to remind Job who he worshiped. The Lord’s prayer teaches us the same thing. When we ask for forgiveness and daily bread, for protection and deliverance, we are admitting to ourselves that we are dependent on God in our daily living. We remind ourselves that He is our provider, our deliverer, our protector.
It’s not about changing God, it’s about God changing me.

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